ISSUES AND THINGS:  AS WINTER DRAWS NIGH  [HUNTER GRAY  11/23/04]

MY KIND OF WEATHER, JACK REED, LUPUS, AND MEDICINE AND JACKSON MOVEMENT AND LESCHI AND MORE

AND SCROLL DOWN FOR RACIAL CONTROVERSY AT FT LEWIS COLLEGE

Hunter,

Sounds like rough weather - and shaky. (I remember, if dimly, the great
"Long Beach Earthquake" of 1933,
which left me with a life-long fear of buildings that shake).

Enjoyed your story of Granville Hicks' book on Reed - and the librarian's
raised eyebrows.

Glad the doctor wasn't unduly worried.

Watch out for the weather! Enjoy the boots.

Peace,
David [McReynolds]  11/23/04
 

Note by Hunter Bear:

This geographical setting in the following Severe Weather Alert is precisely
where we are -- and this is just the kind of weather I like.  With my fine
new Size 16 Lowa Extra Mountain Boots, I [and other likewise well outfitted
family members] expect no problems as we hike along in the "Idaho back
country."  Later, depending on the developing winter, I may get bear paw
snowshoes [good in brush and rocks] but my boots alone may be enough.  As I
have previously indicated, we do need 4WD around these parts.

When I was about 16, I checked out Granville Hicks' fine book on Jack Reed
[John Reed:  The Making of a Revolutionary, The Macmillan Company, New York,
1936.]  Got it at the Arizona State College, Flagstaff, library.  [ASC is
now Northern Arizona University and huge.]  Dad, of course, taught there and
was the long time chair of the Art Department.  The old librarian, Miss
Ragsdale, an Anglo Mississippian -- involved in a many years affair with a
thoroughly reactionary college retainer, Colonel Drake, knew precisely who
Jack Reed was and raised her eyebrows. They were always on the scout for
Reds.  But, a "faculty child," I got the book, which had not, incidentally,
been checked out since about 1938 or so.  [At that point, I had been barely
four years old.]  Later I got my own copy and have it right here, right now.

Anyway, in due course, I came across an old copy of The New Masses [October,
1930] and, therein, was a fine drawing by the excellent radical
cartoonist/artist, Art Young, which had originally appeared in the
predecessor Liberator, " made at the time of Jack Reed's death, October
1920."  Underscored by Reed's bold signature, it shows him -- face up and
chin out, bright-eyed, anticipatory -- advancing steadfastly into a hell of
a dark and windy storm.  And the caption is indeed "Storm Boy." Immediate
empathy!  I clipped that out and it's pasted at the fore in my own copy of
Hicks' book.

I had a regularly scheduled session with our primary doc early last Friday
morning.  Checked me over quickly and thoroughly.  Took a conventional
amount of [routine] blood and indicated that if anything is amiss, he'll
call and "we can go from there."  The medics are always concerned about
kidneys where SLE Lupus and Lupus/Diabetes are involved [as is the case with
me.]  He expressed no undue concern and has not yet called.

There was just last Sunday a 4.0 earthquake near Challis, Idaho, which is
not all that far from us.  So far, three quakes -- this was the biggest --
in this region in a month.  Nothing more from any family skeptics on my
purchase of Earthquake Insurance via State Farm.

Severe Weather Alert for Pocatello, ID

"TRAVEL IN THE IDAHO BACK COUNTRY WILL BE DIFFICULT WEDNESDAY NIGHT AND
THANKSGIVING DAY."

Special Weather Statement - SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT...CORRECTED HAS BEEN
ISSUED FOR LOWER SNAKE RIVER PLAIN VALID FROM TUE NOV 23 2004 03:54 AM MST
UNTIL TUE NOV 23 2004 04:00 PM MST.

EASTERN MAGIC VALLEY-BIG AND LITTLE WOOD RIVER REGION- SAWTOOTH
MOUNTAINS-LOST RIVER/PAHSIMEROI-UPPER SNAKE HIGHLANDS- UPPER SNAKE RIVER
PLAIN-LOWER SNAKE RIVER PLAIN- SOUTH CENTRAL HIGHLANDS-CARIBOU HIGHLANDS-
350 AM MST TUE NOV 23 2004 ...WET WEATHER EXPECTED FOR THANKSGIVING DAY... A
PACIFIC COLD FRONT WILL BRING SNOW TO THE MOUNTAINS AND MIXED RAIN AND SNOW
TO THE VALLEYS WEDNESDAY NIGHT AND THURSDAY. MODERATE SNOW WILL DEVELOP
WEDNESDAY NIGHT IN THE IDAHO CENTRAL MOUNTAINS AND SPREAD TO THE EASTERN
HIGHLANDS BY THANKSGIVING MORNING. THE SNOW LEVEL WILL RISE TO AROUND 6500
FEET AHEAD OF THE COLD FRONT DURING THE DAY THURSDAY THEN FALL TO THE VALLEY
FLOORS BEHIND THE FRONT THURSDAY NIGHT. COLD NORTHWEST WINDS WILL CONTINUE
OVER SOUTHEAST IDAHO THROUGH THE HOLIDAY WEEKEND WITH A FEW SNOW SHOWERS
FROM TIME TO TIME. TRAVEL IN THE IDAHO BACK COUNTRY WILL BE DIFFICULT
WEDNESDAY NIGHT AND THANKSGIVING DAY. HOLIDAY COMMUTERS CAN EXPECT PATCHY
SNOW AND ICE ON ROAD WAYS OVER THE WEEKEND.

Yours, Hunter [Hunter Bear]


HUNTER GRAY  [HUNTER BEAR]   Micmac /St. Francis Abenaki/St. Regis Mohawk
www.hunterbear.org
Protected by Na´shdo´i´ba´i´
and Ohkwari'

In our Gray Hole, the ghosts often dance in the junipers and sage, on the
game trails, in the tributary canyons with the thick red maples, and on the
high windy ridges -- and they dance from within the very essence of our own
inner being. They do this especially when the bright night moon shines down
on the clean white snow that covers the valley and its surroundings.  Then
it is as bright as day -- but in an always soft and mysterious and
remembering way. [Hunter Bear]

NOTE BY HUNTER BEAR 11/24/04
 

A day or so ago, I posted on several matters -- imminently severe weather
for us in Eastern Idaho, John Reed ["Storm Boy"], a very recent and not far
away 4.0 earthquake.  I also indicated a trip to our medics last Friday saw,
among other things, a good deal of blood taken for more testing.  Good news!
A nurse has just called to indicate the test results have just come back,
all OK -- and, in fact, things are improved.  This means, among other
things, that the kidneys -- object of general concern -- are now much safer.

And the rain and snow storms, which I like much, are now upon us.

As Ever, Hunter Bear  11/24/04


HUNTER GRAY  [HUNTER BEAR]   Micmac /St. Francis Abenaki/St. Regis Mohawk
www.hunterbear.org
Protected by Na´shdo´i´ba´i´
and Ohkwari'
 
Something we can all be thankful for at last!!
 
 Another thing to be thankful for:  Soldiers and vets have been taking part
in our peace vigil.

 best
 sam [friedman] 11/24/04
 
Glad to hear the good news, John.  Dale [Jacobson]  11/24/04
 
What good news for the holidays. Hang in there! [Louis Proyect]  11/24/04
 
 
 And Clyde Appleton sent us a great Happy Thanksgiving card.
 
Re your latest medical report:  HALLELU!!  paz, clyde [Appleton] 11/24/04
 
 

Hi, Hunter,

 
What wonderful news for this Thanksgiving season!  Keep up the walking, Sasquatch-man!  
 
Alice Azure  11/27/04
 

That's really great news you've sent about your medical condition.  You have a lot of people praying and thinking positive thoughts for you, Hunter.  That and a strong determination will take one far.  I have no doubt about your determination!

 Scott Colborn   11/28/04

 

MARVELOUS! YOUR HEALTH AND THE STORMS, RE WHICH, ME TOO.
 

Bill Mandel   12/11/04

 

MY PROLOGUE TO THE DENVER POST ARTICLE ON RACIAL CONTROVERSY AT FORT LEWIS COLLEGE  [11/20/04]

NOTE BY HUNTER BEAR [HUNTER GRAY/JOHN R SALTER, JR]:

I have never been an admirer of Ft Lewis College -- located at Durango,
Colorado in the Four Corners region. Although it now has a relatively large
Native student enrollment,  how many Indian faculty are there is
speculative.  When I taught for several years at the main campus of Navajo
Community College [now Dine' College], Tsaile [Say Lee], Navajo Nation, a
number of Navajo and some Utes were there from that Four Corners setting,
and were also at the even closer [to them] NCC branch campus at Shiprock, NM
[near Farmington.] They had not been interested in Ft Lewis College.
Sensitivity and confidentiality are always critically necessary in relating
to people -- students or otherwise.  Those qualities don't seem to  be at
the Ft Lewis fore -- at least not pervasively.

Among the great anthropologists who worked on a life long basis with Native
Americans were Frank Speck of the University of Pennsylvania [working
especially with the Northeastern hunting tribes] and Clyde Kluckhohn of
Harvard [with the Navajo].  They and others of their honorable breed never
printed things deemed by Indian people to be private and confidential --
and they also cleared sensitive material with elders and medicine people.

MY RESPONSES TO BILL MANDEL'S GOOD QUESTIONS  ON FT LEWIS ISSUES [11/21/04]

Dear Bill:

Thanks much for your questions -- attached to this of mine.

I think a primary concern of mine with Prof. Gulliford's approach [and it
seems clear this is a major area of Native student concern at Ft Lewis
College] is that he has badly breached sensitivity and privacy.  Using
confidential data in publications without the person's clear permission, as
the article in the Denver Post indicates he did, is a major No/No in any
honorable circle and especially that of the oft closed tribal [or Fourth
World] cultures anywhere and certainly that of any students:

"He recounted students' stories about sacred rituals, quoted some test
answers and even described medical and family histories in the article
without the students' knowledge or consent. He used many students' real
first names."

Many years ago, the American Indian Center at Chicago -- first of its kind
in the urban United States -- had a major situation when it was learned in
'71 that the then director, Bob Reitz, a non-Indian anthro protégé of the
primary anthro at Univ of Chicago, Sol Tax, had been using confidential
Center social service records in various articles of his own and that of
academic colleagues at the University.  This had been done in a procedurally
secretive fashion by Reitz and learned only when Reitz died of a sudden
heart attack and his records were opened and examined by the Center's Board.

"But Gulliford's detractors are outraged that he generalized about students
by calling them "impeccably polite" and "quiet and well-groomed, with
sometimes irrepressible laughter." He also wrote that "succeeding in school
for these students is not easy."

Gulliford's points about student dress, behavior, and capabilities strike me
as very strange -- sweepingly patronizing with obviously unfair
implications.  For my part, in almost 30 years of college/university
teaching of all sorts of students from a very wide variety of ethnic,
cultural, and social class backgrounds, I have found almost all to be quite
OK in all respects.  Coming from a tribal culture [or any distinctively
non-White setting] into that of a primarily Anglo college can often be
initially challenging for the student -- but he/she can make it just fine if
professors and support staff are appropriately committed and sensitive.
Frankly, I didn't notice any particular problems with any of my students
"succeeding."  [And, btw, Levis, Western shirts, and boots are frequently
standard "dress" at Western colleges -- and still are for me!]  More to the
point, the rise of the tribally-controlled colleges [almost forty now with
the first being NCC in '69] is in major part designed to help students get a
sound bi-cultural education and a solid running academic start into wherever
else they wish to go.

On Clyde Kluckhohn and his perspective on the Soviet Union, I know nothing.
I'll take your word on that.  When one thinks of Kluckhohn in Native and
Native-related circles, one thinks of his consistently fine work with the
Navajo [and that of his often colleague, Dorothy Leighton.]  He was, btw,
much involved with John Collier [a top scholar in his own right and FDR's
extremely capable and long-time Commissioner of Indian Affairs.]

My Mother, a Westerner who had an early BS [1928] in Journalism from
Wisconsin, did her Masters work at Arizona State, Flagstaff in the very late
'40s and early '50s on what the Southwestern colleges and universities
should be doing with Native nations and Native students -- and were clearly
not doing.  This took her [and us] all over the Navajo and Hopi reservations
and brought her into some very friendly contact with Kluckhohn, Collier
[then out of government service] and others in that tradition.  Her work, I
should add, is still considered groundbreaking -- and did make a very
positive contribution in the eventually tangible, constructive moves by many
of those colleges and universities on behalf of Indian people.  Nothing
armchair about her:  I recall on a 50 mile stretch of rough road in a remote
part of the Navajo res near Chinle [Chin Lee], ours was the only motor
vehicle at that point.  Everyone else was riding horses or driving wagons.
[Now pickups, "Navajo Cadillacs," are super common but horses and wagons are
still much around.]  Kluckhohn, like Frank Speck and other good anthros, was
always in the field, and he frequently traveled on horseback.

A great example of early and thorough ethnological work with Indians --
which delineated and observed all of the ethical rules -- can be found in
the substantial compendium of Arthur C Parker's first-rate work:  Parker on
the Iroquois, edited by William N Fenton [Syracuse:  Syracuse University
Press, 1969.]  Arthur Parker was a Seneca [Iroquois],  who was also a key
Native rights organizer [e.g., Society of American Indians], and a major
role model for me.

Best, Hunter Gray [Hunter Bear/John R Salter, Jr]

HUNTER GRAY  [HUNTER BEAR]   Micmac /St. Francis Abenaki/St. Regis Mohawk
www.hunterbear.org
Protected by Na´shdo´i´ba´i´
and Ohkwari'

REAL [REALLY] BRIEF NOTES FROM IDAHO -- THE GEM STATE  [11/08/04]

Dear Hunter:
 
Thanks for your (always consoling) wisdom. There are rough times ahead, for sure. The intolerant and hateful believe that their program has been validated, and in a way it was. Regardless, they control a lot of important institutions that will surely be used against progressive change.
 
But adversity brings out the best in the most courageous among us, like yourself. Yes, he's "alive as you and me."
 
Best,
 
Jay [Weinstein]  11/08/04

 

Amen to talking about fighting back.

David [McReynolds]  11/08/04

 

It's colder now, some rain and increasing snow.  We continue to hike very
regularly and frequently into the 'way up hills.  My Size 16 XL Lowa
Mountain Boots, intricately and substantially cleated, have great traction
on everything. [The pair weighs over four pounds.] They do leave mud on our
floors.

Idaho, of course, went overwhelmingly for Bush.  In the Second Congressional
District, populist Democrat Lin Whitworth -- who we vigorously supported --
drew about 25% of the total vote in his challenge to incumbent Republican
Mike Simpson .  Here in Bannock County --  Pocatello and environs -- Lin
drew about 45 per cent of the total.  His funds were limited, there were
small yard signs and no bumper stickers, but he campaigned with articulate
and folksy vigor.  And he carried the debate with Simpson.  Lin Whitworth
kept the Good Traditions much alive for the next round.  We appreciate the
nice write up of his campaign, with some other campaigns around the country,
in the most recent issue of DSA's Democratic Left.

Late in 1962, arch seg Mayor Allen Thompson of Jackson [Miss.], via all
available news media, blasted the six of us who had just picketed on
downtown Capitol Street, and thus had launched the historic and extremely
effective economic boycott of Mississippi's hate filled capital -- which
quickly grew into the massive Jackson Movement.  Our picket demonstration
lasted about one minute before we were seized and arrested by about 100 cops
[led by anti-civil rights specialist Captain J.L. Ray --  remembered by many
on the SNCC list]. After threatening to sue us [and our  vigorous community
supporters]  for "a million dollars", Thompson then said -- as he was to on
several occasions regarding our mounting activities -- "this mess will
pass."  Well, that "mess" didn't pass -- it just got bigger and bigger --
and Jackson and the State changed, entering the 20th Century and proceeding
far, far beyond.

Our current national mess which is a Big Mess will indeed pass.

Idaho ranks fifth among the lower states in earthquake hazards.  Just
learned that from Idaho State University.  [Remember, I secured earthquake
insurance less then three weeks ago. Few have it locally.]

And in case anyone missed it, this is my prologue to my organizing piece
which I posted widely on November 4 2004.

COMMENT BY HUNTER BEAR  [November 4 2004]

Well, it's been a "cold Monday morning" for sure -- but the River flows on.
For my part, here in pervasively Republican Idaho, I wrote in Walt Brown for
President and Mary Herbert for Vice President [Socialist Party USA] and,
with one local exception , voted a straight Demo ticket after that.  More on
Idaho politics.

Lots of talk now about organizing and fight-back.  [Joe Hill's genuinely
immortal line is being quoted to the Four Directions.]  All well and good --
IF people are really willing to work and work hard.  And especially
to do so over the long, long haul of many years, many rivers, many mountain
ranges.
____________________________________________________________________________
___

Obviously, I'm talking mainly about a  very long burning oak-wood fire, not
just pitchy pine.

As Ever, Hunter

HUNTER GRAY  [HUNTER BEAR]   Micmac /St. Francis Abenaki/St. Regis Mohawk
www.hunterbear.org
Protected by Na´shdo´i´ba´i´
and Ohkwari'

NATIVES AND MEDICINE:  TRADITIONAL AND "WESTERN"  [HUNTER GRAY   12/06/04]

Around 1950 or so, our family stopped at the mission town of Ganado on the
Navajo Reservation where a new hospital had been built.  The administrator,
a physician from far away Phoenix, talked of his frustrations in getting
Dine' clients.  After much diplomacy, he and his small staff had been able
to persuade a number of the always extremely influential Navajo medicine men
to visit and tour the hospital.  Some came and, initially, things seemed --
at least to the Anglo medics -- to go well.  And then one of the medicine
men stepped into a side room.  There he saw human body parts in alcohol.  He
and all his colleagues left the setting immediately.  It took a long time
indeed to even begin to repair that situation.

What happened?  The violation of a major and still universal Navajo taboo:
Chindee, translating into fear of the dead.  All of this is very complex --
far too much for any of the simplistic Tony Hillerman novels. The basic
things:  fear of the dead, avoidance, purification ceremonies.  Some other
tribal nations embrace this concept, under their own linguistic names, but
many do not.  On the other hand, all Indian nations hold to the "good
medicine" / "bad medicine" dichotomy.  Medicine men and related healers
practice good medicine; witches and their allies [runner/messenger "skin
walkers" in the Navajo world]  practice bad medicine.  Among the Navajo,
witches and the skin walkers can and should be killed [as an act of self
defense.]  No legal authorities -- tribal or Federal -- prosecute in these
cases.

A Navajo medicine man trains rigorously -- often for as many as seventeen
years.  There are intermediate levels -- hand tremblers, star gazers -- but
the full fledged Dine' practitioner goes much further in specific training
time than his "western" counterpart.

A witch trains rigorously as well -- and for a very long time.

Our own family, heavily Wabanaki and Iroquois and profoundly influenced and
shaped by the Navajo, holds very much to this.  When, in the early summer of
2003, I began to sense an insidious and ugly disease which was increasingly
malevolent and ghostly, some of us immediately thought "witchcraft" -- and
others didn't rush to summarily rule it out.  And now, well over a year
after the [finally] formal diagnosis of a very lethal variant of SLE Lupus,
we can still wonder about witchcraft.  I have never really appreciated
"western" doctors -- avoided them for decades -- but now, in the final
analysis we have arrived at a point where we don't see the Native beliefs
and "science" as antithetical.

About a generation ago, the Indian Health Service [U.S. Department of Public
Health] and the Navajo medicine men agreed to work together in many
instances. [Well before that, a major Anglo IHS skeptic on medicine men and
Indian  beliefs left the Navajo country forever, a shattered and tottering
wreck.]

This collaboration between the Navajo medicine men and western physicians
has worked very well.  And now, as per the attached article from the Navajo
Times, young Navajo are moving into western medicine.  This isn't new in the
Indian world:  for much more than a century, there have been Native M.D.s --
Carlos Montezuma [Yavapai Apache] and Charles Eastman [Sioux] being among
the early trailblazers.  The Iroquois have furnished a number of physicians
as have other tribal nations.

But this is a big step for the Navajo.

Our grandson/son, Thomas -- Wabanaki, Iroquois, Mississippi Choctaw -- is
moving rapidly into medicine with a strong dimension in psychology. [William
James, an M.D. as well as a pioneer psychologist and key American
philosopher, would be proud of him.]  Thomas, who did very well on his MCAT
exam, has been present for virtually everything --  almost countless medical
tests, consultations -- involving me.  The doctors came to respect his
presence and observations very early on.
 

Dear Hunter,  12/13/04

Thank you for posting the Navajo Times article on marxmail.

I've recently met some of the family members of the physicians in that
article.

I'm an internist working at Shiprock (IHS "Northern Navajo Medical
Center") for a few more days before heading home to upstate NY.

I've read your posts with interest for a few years now, with keen
attention to your personal role as a link the great chain of human
continuity (for example the wobblies' history) but never such keen
attention as after our recent experience!  Heartfelt -- Thank you.

In solidarity,

Andy

(Andrew D. Coates, MD)


HUNTER GRAY [HUNTER BEAR]  MICMAC/ST FRANCIS ABENAKI/ST REGIS MOHAWK

JACKSON MOVEMENT

Here's an important account of the Jackson civil rights movement by an important civil rights activist then and now.
Attorney Steven F. McNichols  San Francisco, CA 94104-3503  12/10/04

Note by Hunter Bear:

This was just sent to me by my son, Pete [Mack], who is an editor of the
Lincoln Journal Star.  I believe it initially appeared in the Clarion Ledger
about three years ago [Following my posting of it, I recall a fine comment
at that time by David McReynolds and also several others.]  Since it has not
appeared on BWB, I am posting it here.  But I am also adding a little more
elaborative comment than I had with its earlier  appearance.

In late 1962 and in 1963, we wrecked via nonviolent boycott, the downtown
Jackson business district [centered in and around Capitol Street] and many
outlying stores as well.  Given that, I suppose we cannot blame the Chamber
and the Tourist Bureau from trying to capitalize on our Civil Rights
Movement.

Mrs Jane Schutt was one of a tiny, tiny number of Mississippi Anglos who
could be described as moderate to liberal.  She headed a very small
interracial prayer group -- modeled closely after a comparable effort in
Union of South Africa.  And, along with others such as Prof Jim Silver at
Ole Miss [author of the eventual Mississippi: The Closed Society], Fr.
Duncan Gray [later Bishop] of the Episcopal Church, Dr AD Beittel of
Tougaloo, was a leader in the also very small Mississippi Council on Human
Relations.  All of this took just plain raw courage.

The CL article contains the classic photo of our Woolworth Sit-In.  It does
not show, although it mentions Memphis Norman [a Tougloo student] who at the
very beginning of things was knocked off his stool and savagely kicked by a
goon, and was then -- while unconscious -- arrested! [Joan on our BWB list
sometimes sees Memphis in DC] Others of us then immediately joined the
sit-in which went on for three hours and at least two hundred thugs.
Condiments -- salt, pepper, sugar, mustard etc -- were dumped on us -- and I
was burned with cigarettes, cut with a broken sugar container, battered with
fists and brass knuckles.  On the other hand, I should add that I do have a
thick skull, a thick hide, and a high pain threshold.  [I learned those
things in grade school and high school -- and well beyond.]

The Mississippi Free Press was a brave and successful effort -- and to lots
of people go the credit.  There were many writers from our general
community: in addition to Medgar and me [named in the CL article], people
like Dr Aaron Henry -- president of state NAACP; Rev Tom Johnson -- a
somewhat fundamentalist missionary preacher from the North who later became,
in Michigan, an Episcopal clergyman; the maverick white lawyer, Bill Higgs;
Colia Liddell, a Tougaloo student and NAACP Youth leader; SNCC and CORE
correspondents; and numerous others.  It was deemed illegal to sell or give
this good quality and genuinely underground paper away [$50.00 fine].  A
major figure in our Free Press life was Mrs Hazel Brannon Smith, of
Lexington, Mississippi, up in Holmes County.  She was one of a tiny, tiny,
tiny number of moderate white Mississippi newspaper people -- always under
attack by the Citizens Council.  She printed our paper and, when she could
not do that safely, arranged to have it printed in Memphis and smuggled
across the border into the "Magnolia Jungle."  When the birth of my first
baby took place [Maria, a key Movement Mascot], it was duly reported in the
Free Press.  Eldri and I recall when Mrs Smith's newspaper branch office in
Jackson -- not far from Tougaloo -- was blown up.

The State Fairgrounds/Concentration Camp was a horrible place.  I was there
twice before being taken into a formal Jackson jail cell.  Police spit and
urinated in drinking water containers and, throwing food on the ground, told
captives, "Eat, dogs, eat."  By the time the Fairgrounds became the
Concentration Camp as our mass marches became ever larger and more
intensive, the daily temps were going to 102.

Sam Bailey was a damn good friend of myself and Medgar. [We were, in
addition to everything else, trying to talk up forming an integrated AMVETS
chapter at Jackson -- but Medgar was killed and the effort got lost in the
larger Movement interaction.]  I saw  Sam -- and quite a few others -- at
the big civil rights retrospective in late 1979, sponsored jointly by
Tougaloo and Millsaps colleges.  He was so appreciative of the fact that I
mention, in my book, the cold blooded murder of Corporal Roman Duckworth,
murdered at Taylorville by a local marshal because he [the Corporal] was in
the front portion of an interstate bus.  Corporal Duckworth, in the MPs, was
on his way home to Laurel where his wife was giving birth to their sixth
child.  The Army sent an integrated color guard to his funeral and our Free
Press gave all of this heavy coverage.

Our BWB list has about 52 members.  At least a dozen were involved in
Mississippi and other Southern and Border South civil rights activities.  In
addition, these and many others indeed are on the Tribute.  And everyone
listed on BWB and Tribute has been involved in all kinds of courageous and
demanding social activist causes.

Probably enough for now.   H


Dad --         12/10/04
Have you seen this? You're mentioned (of course).
4 decades of history still standing amid city's streets


By Gregg Mayer
Clarion-Ledger Staff Writer

A cross wrapped with kerosene-soaked rags burned in Jane Schutt's front yard
in December 1963.


      Fred Blackwell / Special to The Clarion-Ledger

      Like many other cities in the South during the 1960s, Jackson had its
own incidents of racial conflict over traditions, rules, and local laws.
What is now One Jackson Place Plaza is the former site of F.W. Woolworth
where students involved in a sit-in were confronted at the lunch counter on
May 28, 1963.


Back then, Schutt lived in a middle-class white neighborhood. She was
pro-integration, taking young white and black children to a Head Start
program. And she encouraged all races to pray together.

"I guess people didn't like that," said Schutt, who now lives in Florence.

But by Christmas, that same cross was decorated with ivy and put again in
front of her home, just behind a manger scene of Joseph, Mary and baby
Jesus.

"I wanted so desperately before Christmas to turn it into a sign of love,"
Schutt said. "When we put the floodlight on it, it threw the shadow of the
cross on the front of the house. From then on, we used it every year."

Since that time, Schutt's former home at 955 Pecan Blvd., has been
recognized as one of the significant sites from the civil rights era. The
house is one of 55 stops on the Civil Right's Movement Driving Tour in
Jackson.

"It's an introduction, somewhat, of what the community was like during the
'60s," said Alferdteen Harrison, director of the Jackson State University
Margaret Walker Alexander Research Center, which did research for the
three-year project. "It's the context out of which the civil rights movement
grew out of Mississippi."

With gold-and-blue signs, the tour marks historic sites like Medgar Evers'
home, where the civil rights leader was gunned down in his driveway while
carrying "Jim Crow Must Go" T-shirts.

It highlights once-violent locations like the green space off Capital Street
in downtown where a sit-in at the F.W. Woolworth Store in 1963 spurred hours
of beatings and abuse. It shows once horrifying places like the livestock
buildings at the state fairgrounds. In 1963, Mayor Allen Thompson converted
the buildings into hogwire-enclosed compounds for African Americans because
so many protesters were arrested that jail space ran out.

"People pass by that facility on a regular basis and not really know that,"
said Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr., the first African-American mayor of Jackson.

The tour, which cost about $75,000 to put together, is a drive through
nearly four decades of history. The tour will take most people to places
they've never been before in Mississippi's capital city.

"The civil rights movement is the most significant movement in American
history in the second half of the century," said Dernoral Davis, a history
professor at Jackson State who drafted a historical sketch used as a basis
to put the tour together. "It involved all persons from all strata of
American life.

"Jackson, in 1962, 1963, became very much the place the nation watched."

With a 54-page brochure, featuring pictures and short paragraphs about each
site, tour-goers can take about four hours and make the whole drive in a
day, or go on any one of the four sections at a time.

Bruce Payne took part in a city-sponsored test run of the Civil Rights
Movement Driving Tour on a bus about a year ago.

"It's great," said Payne, a news reporter covering civil rights activities
for the black-operated WOKJ in 1963. "I think it's something Jackson needs
to promote and develop.

"I know the places the bus stopped, those were the key points."

The starting point is Smith-Robertson Museum, which was Jackson's first
public school for African Americans. Part One of the tour drives through
downtown, including stops in the Farish Street Historic District, the
dilapidated King Edward Hotel and the green space for the Woolworth sit-in
site.

"It became one of the most documented sit-ins in the 1960s and one of the
last," said the Rev. Ed King, who was there then. "Frequently, I went to
police who were standing outside and seemed to be enjoying what was
happening inside and would not go into the store. The police allowed the
violence to go on.

"Everyone who came in there (after Tougaloo student Memphis Norman, one of
the first to sit at the lunch counter, was severely beaten) knew they could
be killed."

Mustard, catsup, pepper and water were poured onto those participating in
the sit-in. Eventually, the store closed and the protesters were taken to
jail.

The Woolworth sit-in attracted national interest in Jackson, and
precipitated other picketing and sit-ins at Capitol Street businesses.

Part Two of the tour includes stops at Jackson State University; the former
office of the Mississippi Free Press, a four-page civil rights newspaper
written by Evers and John Salter; the home of Samuel Bailey, who filed a
lawsuit challenging the city's segregated bus system and petitioned to
desegregate the schools; and Schutt's home. Part Three goes by Elmwood
Cemetery, where NAACP president Aaron Henry is buried, and by Evers' home.
Part Four highlights Tougaloo College.

"If you came to Jackson, one of the places you were likely to stop over was
at Tougaloo because of the reputation Tougaloo had as a bastion of civil
rights protests," Davis said. "Its students were extremely active."

Plans for the tour are to create an audio tape to accompany the driving tour
and offer narration. Officials also aretrying to link the tour with other
civil rights sites, such as the Civil Rights Museum in Memphis. Davis' text
may be turned into a booklet, Harrison said.

"Right now there is a boom in heritage tourism," said Dee Gardner,
communications coordinator for the Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau.
"Surveys show people are looking for meaningful travel experiences, they're
looking for a little bit of education and cultural opportunities.

"Certainly, that's something we have here in abundance."



----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----

For a copy of the tour brochure, call the Convention and Visitors Bureau at
(601) 960-1891.


HUNTER GRAY  [HUNTER BEAR]   Micmac /St. Francis Abenaki/St. Regis Mohawk
www.hunterbear.org
Protected by Na´shdo´i´ba´i´
and Ohkwari'

In our Gray Hole, the ghosts often dance in the junipers and sage, on the
game trails, in the tributary canyons with the thick red maples, and on the
high windy ridges -- and they dance from within the very essence of our own
inner being. They do this especially when the bright night moon shines down
on the clean white snow that covers the valley and its surroundings.  Then
it is as bright as day -- but in an always soft and mysterious and
remembering way. [Hunter Bear]

CHIEF LESCHI, FOR WHOSE FINE REPUTATION RALPH CHAPLIN AND MANY OTHERS FOUGHT, IS FINALLY VINDICATED AND EXONERATED BY A HISTORICAL COURT

Note by Hunter Bear:  12/11/04

Leschi -- for whose fine reputation Ralph Chaplin and many others fought --
is finally cleared!

Leschi has now been exonerated, vindicated.  He was the honorable and
patriotic Nisqually chief hanged as a scapegoat by the United States
government in 1858 -- following Native resistance to United States troops
and Washington territorial volunteers.

But his own Indian people -- as with almost all Native people in the
Hemisphere -- remain in tough economic shape.

I heard of him first in early 1955, his tragic situation mentioned bitterly
by several Indians from various Pacific Northwest tribes with whom I
associated in the old Seattle Skid Road district.  Many years later, in late
'67 and early '68, while working with Indian people at Buckley, Washington
[near Tacoma], I heard his name again.  And still later, in 1985 and 1986,
while doing extensive research on Ralph Hosea Chaplin -- IWW poet and
songwriter [e.g., Solidarity Forever], life long labor activist and editor,
and a worthy historian [Wobbly: The Rough and Tumble Story of an American
Radical, 1948] -- I suddenly came across Chaplin's excellent and lengthy
epic work on Leschi:  Only the Drums Remembered: A Memento to Leschi
[Tacoma, 1960.] One of the last pieces of literary work produced by Chaplin
before his death at Tacoma early in 1961, it is self-published as a solid
and attractive booklet.

Chaplin, extremely complex [the precise and very friendly characterization
by the venerable Wobbly editor and a mentor of mine, Fred Thompson], spent
his final stretch on the Sunset Trail close to the Catholic Worker
movement -- a good and congenial friend of Catholic anarchist Ammon Hennacy;
and was also very actively involved on behalf of Native rights.  In time, I
accumulated two copies of his Leschi epic which are in my large collection
of radical labor material from the  United States and Canadian West.  Leschi
and Chaplin's epic are a part of my own long essay, Reflections on Ralph
Chaplin, the Wobblies, and Organizing in the Save the World Business -- Then
and Now.  I gave this as a paper at the Pacific Northwest Labor History
Association annual meeting, Eugene, Oregon, May 1986.  It was subsequently
published as the lead essay in the Voices of Western Labor edition, The
Pacific Historian, Summer, 1986.

Here is just a bit from Only the Drums Remembered:

"With Leschi's voice ancestral voices spoke,
Cursing the tyranny of smog and smoke,
Demanding still the right of free-born men
To hear their children's laughter once again --
To celebrate with drums and ritual dance
The freeman's right to take a fighting chance
And go down fighting if they have to die
Facing extinction larded with a lie.

Safeguarding freedom as we safeguard bread
Our graves we honor highly, Leschi said --
No tribe endures unmindful of its dead. . ."


HUNTER GRAY  [HUNTER BEAR]   Micmac /St. Francis Abenaki/St. Regis Mohawk
www.hunterbear.org
Protected by Na´shdo´i´ba´i´
and Ohkwari'

In our Gray Hole, the ghosts often dance in the junipers and sage, on the
game trails, in the tributary canyons with the thick red maples, and on the
high windy ridges -- and they dance from within the very essence of our own
inner being. They do this especially when the bright night moon shines down
on the clean white snow that covers the valley and its surroundings.  Then
it is as bright as day -- but in an always soft and mysterious and
remembering way. [Hunter Bear]


                                                                                                                                                         

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