DEVELOPING ISSUES AND CONTEMPORARY COMMENT

 

 

MATERIAL AND LIBERTARIAN WELL-BEING -- AND FIREARMS

                                                 Hunter Gray

 

I have always held firmly to the right to defend one's self and one's family.  And that, for me, certainly includes principled, armed self-defense.  The following article of mine, much reprinted, and  initially given as a paper at the  national Popular Culture/American Culture Association meeting, New Orleans,   in March 1988, was   originally published in the socialist journal, AGAINST THE CURRENT, (July/August 1988 .)   It  is one of  many articles  I've done over the decades  giving my thoughts on civil rights, civil liberty, and firearms.

First, a few introductory comments:

The ancient and time-honored principle of "tribal responsibility" -- i.e., the group has an obligation to the individual and the individual has one to the group -- with the accompanying dimensions of solidarity and sacrifice -- is a critically essential complex in any fundamentally healthy and vigorous social system.

Included in that traditionally tribal context has always been the working ideal of a full measure of material (physical)  and libertarian well-being:  food, and freedom too.  And that goal, certainly,  has to be the functional ethos of any decent social system,  small or large.

I've always been a very strong and full supporter of both   material  and libertarian well-being.

And there are times, believe me -- many times indeed -- when these must be firmly and effectively protected  -- by  the individual and his/her grassroots colleagues.

I was seven years old when I had my first .22 rifle.   I've had many many  -- conventional -- firearms since then.  I was president of our Flagstaff High School  NRA club -- Northern Arizona small-bore champs.  I was Expert Marksman in the U.S. Army.  I presently have six Western lever action big-bore rifles and one single-barrel  ten gauge magnum shotgun [all of these stemming from pre-1900 patents.]  These continue to be quite useful from a self-defense perspective.

A gun is no better or worse than the person who uses it.

 

gun1.jpg (606599 bytes)

gun2.jpg (676502 bytes)

Continued On The Next Page

 

 

                                                                                                                                                         previous

                index

continue